Archive for January, 2017|Monthly archive page

Loss of a Old Pro

The Bullets, the Wizards, and Washington, DC, Basketball_cover_rev

I was fortunate enough to interview former Baltimore Bullets owner Earl Foreman for this book.

He owned the team that Dr. J started his professional career with in the early 1970s. He was very sharp and funny during the interview. He even played little games to test my knowledge. The best part of the conversation involved all the efforts he made to try and get himself a franchise in the National Basketball Association after selling his portion of the Bullets to Abe Pollin.

Foreman owned the only Washington, D.C. based American Basketball Association team and they made the playoffs.

 

I’m sure his family will miss him greatly.

Advertisements

Neighborhood Arts

At 410GoodBuddy an art show documents the changes in a Washington,D.C. neighborhood over 145 years.  Three artists who live in the Truxton Circle/East Shaw portion of the city have united to create a very good art show that features, maps and city plans, drawings and etchings, and a large installation piece.

Truxton Circle transitioned from a rural area with the first sets of housing developments in the beginning of the 1870s. Unlike the Italianate, Second Empire and Queen Anne mansions surrounding Logan Circle, developers built row houses for the working classes in this area west of North Capitol Street and south of Florida Avenue, the city’s northern boundary.

three_artists

One historian, an architect and a non-profit executive spent some of their spare time investigating where they lived. Their differing ways of visualizing the changes made the show very strong. They gained help in putting the show on through one of the area’s civic associations: the Bates Area Civic Association.

two_sets_f_works

The images feature maps of the neighborhood, drawings of current and former residents and the installation replicating the fountain that became a neighborhood landmark from the early 1900s through the 1940s. fountain

The opening drew a large crowd that enjoyed the variety of what they saw.

opening

There will be more to come with two neighborhood celebrations on upcoming weekends and artist talks.

Rescuing a Dog

Lori came speeding off the transport from North Carolina and ran into the grassy area where we waited to take home our foster dogs. “Who’s got Lori?” said her handler. “I do,” I responded and she handed me her leash. Immediately, the Shepard mix tried to tug me around to get a sense of where she was/

lori-4She looked sad and a little apprehensive when we got home. I tried to hand her a treat but she would not eat it from my hand. Later, we discovered that this was not unusual.

The shelter asked for money to send Lori, then named Elise, to the vet. She had burn marks on her back and was 10 pounds underweight. The people of her home area came through.

Then City Dog Rescue stepped in. The Washington, D.C. based group picked her up among many other dogs and brought them to our area so that someone might adopt them.

My husband and I fed and cared for Lori for two weeks.

lori-5lori-2

Lori began eating out of my hand after one week and she quickly adopted to her requirement to sit before getting to eat her meal. We also hired Anibal S. Apunte to walk her during the day when we weren’t home. He introduced her to other dogs that he walked as a part of her socialization.

Lori enjoyed her runs immensely! She proved to be a good member of the pack as well.

A few days later, two great human companions adopted her and rechristened her Saga after a modern heroic narrative resembling the Icelandic saga and her own long struggle. She has a happy new home and lease on life.

NHL Forward Thinking Forward

 

Brad Marchand of the Boston Bruins faced an interesting choice after receiving a tweet with a homophobic slur in it. Pete Blackburn explains what the Bruins’ left winger did.usatsi_9743954-vadapt-767-high-0

Towards the beginning of his NHL career, Brad Marchand quickly developed a reputation as being a nuisance on the ice. He established himself as an effective pest and agitator, but also was labeled as “dirty” after a few controversial hits and incidents.

In his arsenal of tactics, Marchand has been known to low-bridge, sucker punch and slew foot opponents. His trash talk game is also tremendous and relentless.

While those aspects of his game haven’t completely been eradicated, in the past few years the Bruins winger has become more recognized for his elite two-way skill. He has developed into a leader for the Boston club and, this past fall, scored the clinching goal at the World Cup of Hockey while playing on Canada’s top line alongside Sidney Crosby.

Marchand, 28, credits that growth to being older and more mature, saying his “priorities have changed” over the years. But it’s not just his on-ice play that has become more admirable.

Recently, Marchand has become somewhat of a champion for people in the LGBT community. In December, the winger was attacked on a Twitter with a homophobic slur. In a since-deleted tweet, Marchand responded to the hate by publicly shaming the person who sent the vitriolic remarks his way, saying “this derogatory statement is offensive to so many people around the world, [you’re] the kind of kid parents are ashamed of.” The response prompted the user to delete his account.

Marchand was applauded for standing up for the gay community and taking a proactive approach to silencing the hate, and ESPN’s Joe McDonald recently spoke to Marchand about the exchange.

“I want to stand up for what I believe in, and I don’t think it’s right when people say things or bash people because of their sexual orientation,” said Marchand, via ESPN. “I have friends who are in gay relationships, and I don’t think it’s right for people to be against that. Everyone is allowed to find love whatever way that is, so I felt like that was a time to say something, especially nowadays. We’re in 2017, and things are a lot different than they were 100 years ago. We’re all evolving to be equal, and that’s the way things should be.”

When asked whether or not an openly gay player would be accepted in an NHL locker room, Marchand delivered a strong vote of confidence in favor of equality.

“Guys would accept that, no question,” Marchand assured. “We’re a team in the [dressing] room and a family. It doesn’t matter what different beliefs guys have, or where they come from, or whatever the case may be. Guys would accept it. Again, in the room we’re a family. That’s the way it is on a hockey team, and that’s the way it will always be.”

There has yet to be an openly gay player in the league, though Marchand says it’s “bound to happen at some point, and when it does, it will be accepted.” The NHL has had a large number of players endorse the You Can Play campaign, which is dedicated to eradicating homophobia from sports, so it certainly appears that Marchand isn’t the only star who feels this way.

Fostering Dogs

We’re starting the new year with a new house member. Lori, a two-year old Shepard mix, came into the family last night from City Dog Rescue.

lori-2

She was highly excited as she explored the first floor of our house. She had no problem climbing the stairs to join us on the second floor, but apprehensive gripped her when she could not figure out how to climb downstairs. I walked her gently down holding onto her collar. Lori immediately climbed back upstairs, then second later, she walked down the stairs herself!

We’ve noticed that she is not one for getting up on the furniture, eschewing the bed and chairs. We’ve put down a rug for her to lie on and that has pleased her.

lori-5

So far her personality is significantly different from the last foster that we had in December. He wanted to smell everything and she has hardly sniffed a thing. He thought the furniture was his throne. He was a big tug-of-war player and she has hardly put her teeth on the toy. It’s early yet but will be interesting to note what Lori does enjoy doing.