Archive for the ‘Terry Bradshaw: From Super Bowl Champion to Television Personality’ Tag

Bradshaw Offers Another Opinion

Terry Bradshaw is never short on opinions and has no trouble expressing his. He jumps in on the latest Steelers’ concern over running back Le’Veon Bell. You can see this in my book on the former quarterback and in the piece that follows

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2795449-i-would-have-signed-him-terry-bradshaw-says-only-bell-can-lead-steelers-to-sb

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The Shaq Brand

Tonight on HBO’s Real Sports, they focus on an athlete who has successfully created a major brand for himself in today’s culture. Athletes branding themselves was the topic of a book I wrote last year. One of the biggest sports idols to create a huge market for himself in popular culture is basketball player Shaquille O’Neal. He is on television offering basketball analysis on TNT and TBS. He has commercials for The General Insurance Company, Carnival Cruise Line and Icy Hot pain relief among others.

The man has a brand and he calls it making you happy and smile.

The big fella is following in the footsteps of another big-time  sports figure: Steelers Quarterback Great Terry Bradshaw. Bradshaw has a boat load of commercials, records, movies, and a regular perch analyzing football on Fox.

Bradshaw has the “Southerner good-old boy act” and he seeks to bring a smile and laugh to people. His brand is detailed in my book: Terry Bradshaw: From Super Bowl Champion to Television Personality

 

Bradshaw Book Review

Slowly getting the word out on my Terry Bradshaw book. this is a review by a Carolina Panther football team writer.

https://www.catscratchreader.com/2018/1/20/16912228/terry-bradshaw-from-super-bowl-champion-to-television-personality-a-csr-book-review

Terry Bradshaw: From Super Bowl Champion to Television Personality; a CSR book review

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Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

For Panthers fans it’s a narrative that sounds all too familiar. He’s a big guy, a quarterback with obvious talent and a canon for an arm but critics aren’t buying in. Despite early success, turnovers have been a problem, injuries have been persistent and there’s the big question, is he smart enough to run a pro offense? This was the narrative surrounding future four time Super Bowl winner and MVP Terry Bradshaw not just for the few seasons of his career but even after he had won his first championship.

The narrative that Bradshaw was a country bumpkin without enough upstairs to manage his own play calls haunted the quarterback throughout his entire playing career and well afterwards. Despite testimonies from his coaching staff, teammates and friends that Bradshaw was highly intelligent and capable, the image had stuck and he would spend decades learning to live with it. After playing through injury, enduring a constant rotation at quarterback and struggling with the ethics of labor disputes, Bradshaw forged a career that eventually ended up in the Hall of Fame.

What no one realized back then was Bradshaw had the talent to go far beyond field. When his playing time was up Bradshaw found himself broadcasting games, hosting the pre-game show and eventually pulling down a permanent spot as a fixture of Sundays in the NFL but despite even this level of success Bradshaw’s real passion was in the most unlikely of places.

In the NFL of the 1970s, player contracts weren’t the multi-million dollar affairs they are now. In fact, it was common for the biggest stars to hold day jobs in the off season to pay the bills. Bradshaw was no exception. However, as the coaches and team would soon understand, his talents in other arenas threatened to end his playing career.

Since he was a young boy Bradshaw had been a fan of country music and gospel. It was his status as a pro football player that afforded him the opportunity to begin recording albums and spend the spring and summer of his playing years touring, performing gigs and laying down tracks in Nashville. What we know as the animated, goofy sports anchor spent much of his younger years as a popular radio presence with multiple top 50 offerings. Having a voice that was untrained but resonant with fans nationwide turned Bradshaw into a household name amongst Americans who never watched sports on TV. This says nothing of his roles on TV and movies including a friendship with Burt Reynolds that earned Terry the moniker ‘Hollywood’ in the locker room.

If you thought you knew everything there was worth knowing about Terry Bradshaw from his appearances on the field, there’s a strong possibility you missed out on some of the most interesting aspects of a unique icon in the industry. With an exceptionally well researched account of the life and times of Terry Bradshaw from his birth in Shreveport, Louisiana to four rings with the Pittsburgh Steelers and his shortened career due to injury. Terry Bradshaw: From Super Bowl Champion to Television Personality belongs in the die hard sport’s fans library as an insightful revelation from the fan’s perspective.

You can purchase a copy of Terry Bradshaw: From Super Bowl Champion to Television Personality here.

Steelers’ Fans and Terry Bradshaw

Podcast about my Terry Bradshaw: From Super Bowl Champion to Television Personality Book: Part of the Steel City Underground Fan Group:

The discussion ranged from his playing days with the Pittsburgh Steelers to acting in Burt Reynolds movies, to his efforts today as a studio analyst with Fox and also in the television shows, Better Late Than Never and his latest movie, Father Figures.

http://www.steelcityunderground.com/podcast/2017/12/different-perspective-terry-bradshaw-author-historian-brett-abrams/

Terry Bradshaw: New Books Network Podcast

I discussed my book Terry Bradshaw: From Super Bowl Champion to Television Personality with Bob D’Angleo, a sports reporter, on the New Book Network a few days ago. The discussion ranged from his playing days with the Pittsburgh Steelers to acting in Burt Reynolds movies, to his efforts today as a studio analyst with Fox and also in the television shows, Better Late Than Never and his latest movie, Father Figures.

Here is the link:

http://newbooksnetwork.com/brett-l-abrams-terry-bradshaw-from-super-bowl-champion-to-television-personality-rowman-and-littlefield-2017/

 

Locker Rooms and Sexual Harassment: 90s Style

The recent spate of announcements regarding sexual harassment has been amazing. We may not have been surprised by the harassment in Hollywood with its “casting couch” history.We aren’t surprised about these activities in sports, we can’t be surprised about this occurring in the halls of media organizations either. One incident from the long history of harassment appears in my book, Terry Bradshaw: From Super Bowl Champion to Television Personality.

Fewer than three months into their jobs and co-anchors of CBS’ The NFL Today Pregame show, Terry Bradshaw and Greg Gumbel faced a major incident. Five New England Patriots players had told crude jokes and two fondled their genitals as Boston Herald reporter Lisa Olson was covering their locker room after a Monday Night Football game in mid-September 1990. Olson issued a complaint.

Then Patriots owner Victor Kiam, of Gillette Razor fame made things worse. Kiam had a brief exchange with the reporter in the locker room the following week. He turned to a member of his entourage who was standing by his side and said sotto voce, “She’s a classic bitch. No wonder the players don’t like her.” Patriots’ fans piled on, showering her with obscenities and vile suggestions and statements as “If you want
to go into the men’s locker room, you get what you deserve.”

The case of Melissa Ludtke v. Bowie Kuhn, in 1978, had opened the doors, literally, for female reporters. The ruling determined that keeping the Sports Illustrated reporter out of the New York Yankees’ locker room during the 1977 World Series deprived her of the equal opportunity to pursue her profession. The NFL did not enact an equal access policy until 1985. Female sportswriters faced frequent discrimination, harassment, and fraternity-type pranks like wet towels being whipped against their behinds as they waded through the male athletes to reach the person they wanted to interview.

How would Bradshaw and Gumbel address the explosive situation? A Dayton sportswriter described Patriots fans as Puritans.
The abuse they directed toward Olson betrayed their male chauvinism, which basically said, “You are a woman; know your place.” In contrast, NBC’s pregame analyst Will McDonough rushed a quick response to the incident and claimed Olson “exaggerated her story.”

The CBS pregame show made Leslie Visser the lead in the discussions on the issue. Bradshaw described how he thought the public saw the issue, contending, “We can be as lenient and we can be as accepting to the opposite sex all we want to. But there comes an area where a man just absolutely closes his mind up and says no.” Mary Carillo, analyst for women’s and men’s tennis on CBS and ESPN, responded, “I think
that’s valid, a very valid point. Football always has been perceived as a male domain. Tennis isn’t like that—(John) McEnroe and (Ivan) Lendl
know I have the same skills, so it isn’t a stretch.”

Cathy Barreto who became the first female director for NFL games in the late 1980s, argued for female announcers in football. She thought
that for a female announcer to be accepted, “it’s going to have to be a recurring thing—not just once in a while. . . . Really no different than a
man—except people aren’t used to it.”

Bradshaw recalled growing up in Shreveport and witnessing the slow dissolution of racial segregation, another instance where people needed to get used to change. He listened to women analyze golf on television and accepted them because he learned from them. “I’m looking for knowledge. I don’t care what the sex is,” he said.

Nearly 30 years of past since this incident. The culture has only recently began fleshing out incidents of sexual harassment. Women broadcasters do not regularly in the broadcast booth for football. There is one woman appearing along the sidelines as a reporter but no more than one. ESPN did add one woman to their broadcast booth for major league baseball. As Carillo’s comment suggested, sports still seek an name athlete in the sport to appear in the broadcast booth as a color commentator. But broadcast booths can be expanded as ESPN has done to add a woman, and women can also be given more opportunities as play-by-play announcers. First, the sexism, both overt with the harassment, and covert, with hiring tendencies, needs to be contained then eliminated.